Impact across generations

      

My job involves working with international organizations to develop policies that improve access to medicines for people worldwide. I’m originally from New Zealand and came to Japan as a diplomat.

When I was in my twenties, I was saved by medicine. I joined Takeda three and a half years ago. The corporate philosophy, in particular the “Nori” principles, made a lot of sense to me. I interpret these principles to mean that we shouldn’t sacrifice the future for short-term gain, and I think this helps explain why Takeda has survived for 237 years. This is Japanese wisdom, but it applies globally, too.

Since joining Takeda, I’ve yet to feel a true sense of accomplishment. That’s because improving access to medicine is something that takes time to achieve. It’s not about immediate results. In fact, I’ve learned that it can take generations to make an impact. Takeda’s mission is to serve people. It’s quite simple. It’s a pleasure to be able to work at a company like this, and I want to keep looking for the best way that I can serve people too.
   

    
Ben Wilson  

I came to Japan as a diplomat. My inspiration for changing careers first came in my early twenties when I was saved by new medicine.